The situation of the mentally and physically disabled in Bali

We were not surprised to learn that the situation of mentally and physically disabled in Bali is similar to those in Thailand. Sarah Chapman, who is part of the outreach team of the NGO Yayasan Solemen Indonesia, told us some of her experiences, and it sounded pretty much like what we have heard in Thailand.

Karma

The main religion in Bali is Hinduism. The Balinese religion and culture is rich and beautiful: All the temples, ceremonies, sarongs, and flower offerings. It is stunning. Ok, there are also parts of Bali religion, we do not appreciate, like animal offerings.

Just like the Thai Buddhists, the Balinese believe in Karma. Thus, being born with a physical disability means bad Karma, and disabled people are hidden (sometimes locked) away. They are considered a shame for the family

Read this article to learn more about the situation of the disabled in Thailand.

Education

But Karma is not the only reason why people hide their physically, mentally and psychologically disabled family members. There is also a great lack of education about these diseases. Many do not know that psychological illnesses can be treated with medication. People with psychological disorders are often locked away because they are a threat to themselves and to others.

Traditional believes

Further, many Balinese prefer to rely on traditional medication and rituals to treat mental and physical diseases. Even though, one should not underestimate the power of traditional and natural remedies, certain diseases cannot be treated this way.

Infrastructure

Besides Karma and education, another main problem is the health infrastructure. Sick people are often not taken to a doctor or a hospital, because the village is too remote. Sometimes, the village people do not know where exactly the next hospital is, and how to get there. Most of the times, the journey to the hospital is too expensive. The families do not know where to stay close to the hospital, and simply cannot afford to stay away from work for a couple of days.

Solemen does field trips to reach the remote villages, and to help the families bring the ill to a doctor. To read more about Solemen click here.

Why Aids remains a major problem in Thailand – Field trip with Rejoice

This week we have made a field trip to Chiangdao and Phrao with Gee, Wi and Arm from Rejoice.

Rejoice works predominantly with HIV-positive persons and those suffering from Aids in the North of Thailand. We have visited clinics and made home visits in order to distribute free medication to those followed by Rejoice.

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Rejoice does not distribute anti-viral medication which is only available in hospitals. Rejoice offers treatment for side-effects of the anti-viral medication and accompanying sickness of Aids.

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Before the field trip we have met Alan Wheeler of Rejoice UK in Chiang Mai who has told us a lot about HIV in Thailand. As Don Willcox and Saovanee Nilavongse have already told us, Rejoice has difficulties to obtain donations directly in Thailand. According to Alan, 90% of Rejoice’s funds come from abroad. Many Thai people prefer to donate to temples rather than to humanitarian organisations.

Chiang Mai was the epicentre of Aids in Thailand 15 years ago and even though the situation has improved, the region still struggles with the repercussions. Especially the rural population is affected by the virus.

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As of today, the public Thai health system provides free medical care for persons suffering from Aids. Further, the HIV tests are paid for by the Thai health insurance which is available for all Thai persons which are registered. A good example of state measures is that HIV test are mandatory for pregnant women in order to prevent a possible transmission of the virus to the new born.

Even though Alan has qualified the governmental action as “good,” several problems persist and HIV and Aids remain a major issue in Thailand.

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All people living in Thailand are not registered and thus have no access to free health care. Especially hill tribes, which speak different languages and often do not speak Thai, do not make the necessary procedures. Further, there are many migrant workers which come from neighbouring countries and which often are in Thailand without a work permit.

According to Alan, another problem is the transportation to the hospitals and clinics. Don has told us about the same problem. The most vulnerable often live far from medical care institutions. The transportation is relatively expensive for the rural population and takes a lot of time which often means one lost day of work.

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Further, and this leads us to the third major problem, going to a hospital could attract the neighbours’ curiosity. HIV and Aids, just like handicaps, remain stigmatised in Thailand. Bad information of the transmission of HIV make that HIV-positive persons are socially rejected and isolated.

We have noticed that Gee has taken a lot of time to talk to the patients. Unfortunately, we do not yet understand Thai, but the discussions seemed very amicable. Gee explained that many persons suffering from Aids stop taking the anti-viral medication when they start to feel better. Even though the medication is free for most, many do not consider it necessary when the symptoms of the sickness disappear.

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Our field trip with Gee has shown us that HIV and Aids remain a problem in Thailand in terms of prevention, treatment and information. Alan and Gee have told us much more about HIV and Aids in Thailand and about the persons suffering from it. If you have any questions you can contact us. You can also read Rejoice’s last report.

PS : On our way to Chiangdao and Phrao we stopped at a primary school in Chiangdao to distribute fruits to the children whose parents are mostly field workers. There is no direct link to Rejoice work on HIV and Aids, but it shows the diversity of its work. Here are some pictures: